Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities

The CRPD is an international resolution to increase the rights and opportunities for people with disabilities. This builds upon the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, but adds support for those that need it the most.

The rights enumerated in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in a perfect world, would be enough to protect everyone. But in practice certain groups, such as women, children and refugees have fared far worse than other groups and international conventions are in place to protect and promote the human rights of these groups. Similarly, the 650 million people in the world living with disabilities—about 10 per cent of the world’s population—lack the opportunities of the mainstream population. They encounter a myriad of physical and social obstacles that:

  • Prevent them from receiving an education;
  • Prevent them from getting jobs, even when they are well qualified;
  • Prevent them from accessing information;
  • Prevent them from obtaining proper health care;
  • Prevent them from getting around;
  • Prevent them from “fitting in” and being accepted.

Why a Convention? – Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities – United Nations

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Future Accessibility for Financial Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities

This short presentation was an introduction to a panel discussion on how financial institutions can use new technology to provide accessible solutions. It was part of this event: G3ict Hosts International Briefing: Inclusive Financial Services for Seniors and Persons with Disabilities, Paris, France

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Notes from the Disability Matters 2016 conference

The Disability Matters conference helps companies increase their employee diversity by building an accessible workplace and hiring more people with disabilities. The following are some of the notes I took during this event. Many were also shared on my Twitter feed.
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ARIA Label Bookmarklet

I love simple bookmarklets that visualize coding patterns. I was working on a project today and wanted to verify that aria-labels were sufficiently descriptive. So I put together this quick bookmarklet.

aria-label bookmarklet

Simply drag that up to your bookmark bar and click on it whenever you need to test a page.

If an element has an aria-label, it should get a yellow background and the label displayed in red. Your particular styles may affect this.

If an has an aria-labelledby, it should have a pink background and the object it is pointing to will be displayed in green.
I’m labelling the next element

Usage

I’m using this on a project that uses aria-label extensively in a complicated form. In the past, I found some of the aria-label attributes didn’t provide adequate context, so this now makes it pretty simple to discover.