Accessibility Keywords for Data Mining

List of accessibility keywords

How do you know what your customers with a disability are sharing with your company’s feedback forms and surveys? Is there an option for them to self-declare they have a disability? Probably not. The following list of keywords has been compiled from various sources and will help you data mine your customer feedback to find the voice of your disabled customers.

Sarah Margolis-Greenbaum and I will be talking about what we learned via this list at our upcoming Trickle-Down Accessibility talk at CSUN 2018.

Contribute to this list via the a11y-data-keywords project on GitHub.

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Trickle Down Accessibility – CSUN Preview

Matt May tweeted an observation in 2016 introducing Trickle-Down Accessibility and recognized prioritizing our blind customers could lead to less support for others.
Continue Reading Trickle Down Accessibility – CSUN Preview

I will be discussing Trickle-Down Accessibility at the 2018 CSUN Assistive Technology Conference on Wednesday, March 21 at 2:20 pm in Cortez Hill C, 3rd Floor, Seaport Tower.

The following is the proposal for this presentation. I will publish the final presentation for further details.

Trickle-Down Accessibility Proposal

Trickle Down Economics[1] suggests economic growth benefits all members of society. The focus is on tax benefits for corporations and the higher income population, as they have the potential for making larger impacts in economic growth. Providing financial incentives to this population will, in theory, eventually result in higher prosperity for all.

Matt May’s observation on Twitter in 2016 raised awareness of Trickle Down Accessibility:

“Watching a blind advocate tell someone with another disability to center blind issues first and wait for the benefits to trickle down. Wow. [2]

Focusing on screen reader accessibility has distinct advantages for product developers. If your application works with a screen reader, it should also be usable with a keyboard, voice recognition, and switch control devices. Screen reader accessibility also falls in line with automated testing tools.

However, there are many disabilities, and assistive technologies, that are not necessarily benefited by this focus on the blind/low-vision community. Color contrast, closed captioning, readability, consistency in design, user customization, session timeouts, and animation distraction are just a few examples of concerns that often go unaddressed.

Continue Reading Trickle Down Accessibility – CSUN Preview

Find aria-hidden with this bookmarklet

Use this bookmarklet to find aria-hidden attributes on your page. Continue Reading Find aria-hidden with this bookmarklet

I love purpose built bookmarklets that help you find problematic code. I got an email yesterday from Travis Roth about a potential vestigial aria-hidden attribute on an otherwise visible element. Unfortunately, it’s not uncommon to find an element that has aria-hidden=”true” on an element that is visible and should have either “false” or no aria-hidden attribute. This causes assistive technology to ignore the element.

My first reaction was to search the code for aria-hidden attributes, but this can take time and would have to be completed on each page to find the issue.

So I created the following bookmarklet that will find any element on your page that uses aria-hidden. It will force it to be visible and will display the attribute’s value.

screenshot showing the bookmarklets effect on hidden elements

To use this bookmarklet, drag the following link to your bookmark toolbar. Visit your questionable page and click the link.

aria-hidden bookmarklet
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Google IO 2017 – Accessibility Notes

Building an accessibility team

The project champion needs to make sure training is available to all people on the team.

  • Create a set of primary and secondary key work paths, i.e. put an item in a shopping cart (first) change avatar image (secondary)
  • Add a checklist and try user testing

Resources and Ideas:

What’s new in Android Accessibility

Accessibility | Android Developers

Accessibility is an important part of any app. Whether you’re developing a new app or improving an existing one, ensure that components are accessible to everyone.

Why develop for accessibility

  • 1 in 5 people will have a disability in their life. – 2010 census
  • Designing for accessibility benefits blind, low vision, and eyes occupied (driving)

Android includes 4 types of assistive technology:

  • TalkBack: Screen reader
  • BrailleBack: Braille output for refreshable braille devices
  • Switch Access: switch control of device
  • Voice Access: control device by voice activation: “scroll up”

Android O’s major focus: increase productivity for users

  • new api additions for accessibility
  • print disabilities (reading disabilities)

New to TalkBack

accessibilityVolume: adjust audio volumen for accessibiity independently from media. So you can watch youtube and control that separately than talkback. This is available when talkback is on.

Volume from youtube is quieted while talkback is being used. it then fades back into the foreground. There’s a new accessibility volume slider

New gestures for talkback.

If there’s a fingerprint sensor on the back of the device, it can be used by talkback users. The sensor has its own set of customizable gestures. For instance,  swipe up on the fingerprint. These can be assigned, such as longpress action

Quickly enable/disable TalkBack

long press the volume keys to quickly turn on/off talkback.

this works on any screen, this makes it easier to test apps and turn off talkback to type information. Press both keys at the same time for a long press and eventually it will turn on/off talkback. the accessibility shortcut can be assigned to switch control, zoom, or other service.

New Text to speech engine can handle multiple languages. Use LocaleSpan to trigger language switching.

2 new APIs

Continuous Gesture API: enable motor impaired users who use head tracker to perform drag and drop, zoom, etc.

Accessibility Button:

A new accessibility button is located in the navigation bar. This allow users to quickly invoke context dependent accessibility features. This sits in the row with back and home buttons

Print disabilities

People with dyslexia, low vision, learning new language… They can now use select to speak. part of talkback 5.2. Select element on screen and talkback will read it. It has a floating action button to enable.

In android o. read whole page, and advanced controls, word level highlighting, set up wizard.


manual testing: try your app with TalkBack and SwitchAccess.

  • if it is ok in talkback, it should be good for brailleback and select to speak
  • if it works with switch access, it should also work with voice access.

Accessibility Scanner, free app to download on play store. Android's Accessibility Scanner

This analyzes the current screen and provides an audit that can be shared.

The accessibility test framework is still requiring espresso and/or robolectric

Android Accessibility Documentation

Android has a new developer hub for understanding accessibility. There’s a page for Android testing.

Web4All 2017 notes for April 3, 2017

Microsoft’s Inclusive HIring

Microsoft’s David Masters started the day with a keynote discussing Microsoft’s Journey Towards Inclusion

Microsoft has had a cultural shift in the last 18 months.
Their new mission statement is:

Empower every person and every organization on the planet to achieve more

Continue Reading Web4All 2017 notes for April 3, 2017